Use of aspirin and other nonsteroidal antiinflammatory medications in relation to prostate cancer risk.

Publication Type:

Journal Article

Source:

American journal of epidemiology, Volume 172, Issue 5, p.578-90 (2010)

Keywords:

2010, Adult, African Americans, Aged, Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal, Anticarcinogenic Agents, Aspirin, Case-Control Studies, Center-Authored Paper, Cyclooxygenase 2, European Continental Ancestry Group, Genotype, Health Behavior, Human Biology Division, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Prostatic Neoplasms, Public Health Sciences Division, Shared Resources, Socioeconomic Factors, Specimen Processing Core Facility

Abstract:

Recent interest has focused on the role that inflammation may play in the development of prostate cancer and whether use of aspirin or other nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) affects risk. In a population-based case-control study designed to investigate the relation between these medications and prostate cancer risk, detailed exposure data were analyzed from 1,001 cases diagnosed with prostate cancer between January 1, 2002, and December 31, 2005, and 942 age-matched controls from King County, Washington. A significant 21% reduction in the risk of prostate cancer was observed among current users of aspirin compared with nonusers (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.65, 0.96). Long-term use of aspirin (>5 years: odds ratio = 0.76, 95% CI: 0.61, 0.96) and daily use of low-dose aspirin (odds ratio = 0.71, 95% CI: 0.56, 0.90) were also associated with decreased risk. There was no evidence that the association with aspirin use varied by disease aggressiveness, but there was effect modification (P(interaction) = 0.02) with a genetic variant in prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2) (rs12042763). Prostate cancer risk was not related to use of either nonaspirin NSAIDs or acetaminophen. These results contribute further evidence that aspirin may have chemopreventive activity against prostate cancer and highlight the need for additional research.