Single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with risk for contralateral breast cancer in the Women's Environment, Cancer and Radiation Epidemiology (WECARE) study.

Publication Type:

Journal Article

Source:

Breast cancer research : BCR, Volume 13, Issue 6, p.R114 (2011)

Keywords:

2011, December 2011, Public Health Sciences Division

Abstract:

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Genome-wide association studies, focusing primarily on unilateral breast cancer, have identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a number of genomic regions that have alleles associated with a significantly increased risk of breast cancer. In the current study we evaluate the contributions of these previously identified regions to the risk of developing contralateral breast cancer. The most strongly disease-associated SNPs from prior studies were tested for association with contralateral breast cancer. A subset of these SNPs, selected upon their main effects on contralateral breast cancer risk was further evaluated for interaction with treatment modalities and estrogen receptor (ER) status. METHODS: We genotyped 21 SNPs in 708 women with contralateral breast cancer and 1394 women with unilateral breast cancer who serve as the cases and controls in the Women's Environment, Cancer and Radiation Epidemiology Study. Records of treatment and ER status were available for most of WECARE Study participants. Associations of SNP genotypes and risk for contralateral breast cancer were calculated with multivariable adjusted conditional logistic regression methods. RESULTS: Multiple SNPs in the FGFR2 locus were significantly associated with contralateral breast cancer, including rs1219648 (per allele rate ratio (RR) =1.25, 95%CI=1.08-1.45). Statistically significant associations with contralateral breast cancer were also observed at rs7313833, near the PTHLH gene (per allele RR=1.26, 95%CI=1.08-1.47), rs13387042 (2q35) (per allele RR=1.19, 95%CI=1.02-1.37), rs13281615 (8q24) (per allele RR=1.21, 95%CI=1.04-1.40), and rs11235127 near TMEM135 (per allele RR=1.26, 95%CI=1.04-1.53). The A allele of rs13387042 (2q35) was significantly associated with contralateral breast cancer in ER negative first tumors while the A allele of rs11235127 (near TMEM135) was significantly associated with contralateral breast cancer in ER positive first tumors. Although some SNP genotypes appeared to modify contralateral breast cancer risk with respect to tamoxifen treatment or particular radiation doses, trend tests for such effects were not significant. CONCLUSION: Our results indicate that some common risk variants associated with primary breast cancer also increase risk for contralateral breast cancer, and that these risks vary with the ER status of the first tumor.