Serum antibody response following genital {alpha}9 human papillomavirus infection in young men.

Publication Type:

Journal Article

Source:

The Journal of infectious diseases, Volume 204, Issue 2, p.209-16 (2011)

Keywords:

2011, Adolescent, Antibodies, Viral, Center-Authored Paper, Cohort Studies, DNA, Viral, Genital Diseases, Male, Human Biology Division, Humans, Male, Papillomaviridae, Papillomavirus Infections, Public Health Sciences Division, September 2011, SERUM, Students, Young Adult

Abstract:

Background. Although the prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) genital infection is similarly high in males and females, seroprevalence is lower in males. This study assessed rates and determinants of seroconversion after detection of genital HPV infection in young men. Methods. We investigated HPV type-specific seroconversion in a cohort of heterosexual male university students who had an α9 HPV type (HPV-16, -31, -33, -35, -52, -58, or -67) detected in the genital tract (n = 156). HPV DNA and antibodies were detected and typed using liquid bead-based multiplex assays. We calculated seroconversion using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. Cox proportional hazards models with generalized estimating equations were used to examine associations with seroconversion. Results. Within 24 months of detecting genital HPV infection, type-specific seroconversion ranged from 4% for HPV-52 to 36% for HPV-31. HPV-16 seroconversion at 24 months was 13% (95% confidence interval [CI], 7%-25%). Among incident HPV infections, ever cigarette smoking and infection site(s) (shaft/scrotum and glans/urine vs shaft/scrotum or glans/urine only) were positively associated with type-specific seroconversion. Conclusions. For each of the α9 HPV types, type-specific seroconversion within 24 months was observed in 36% or less of infected men. Seroconversion might be related to cigarette smoking and genital site(s) infected.