Multi-institutional prostate cancer study of genetic susceptibility in populations of African descent.

Publication Type:

Journal Article

Source:

Carcinogenesis, Volume 32, Issue 9, p.1361-5 (2011)

Keywords:

2011, African Americans, Aged, Center-Authored Paper, Gene Deletion, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Glutathione Transferase, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Prostatic Neoplasms, Public Health Sciences Division, September 2011, Smoking/adverse effects

Abstract:

Prostate cancer disparities have been reported in men of African descent who show the highest incidence, mortality, compared with other ethnic groups. Few studies have explored the genetic and environmental factors for prostate cancer in men of African ancestry. The glutathione-S-transferases family conjugates carcinogens before their excretion and is expressed in prostate tissue. This study addressed the role of GSTM1 and GSTT1 deletions on prostate cancer risk in populations of African descent. This multi-institutional case-control study gathered data from the Genetic Susceptibility to Environmental Carcinogens (GSEC) database, the African-Caribbean Cancer Consortium (AC3) and Men of African Descent and Carcinoma of the Prostate Consortium (MADCaP). The analysis included 10 studies (1715 cases and 2363 controls), five in African-Americans, three in African-Caribbean and two in African men. Both the GSTM1 and the GSTT1 deletions showed significant inverse associations with prostate cancer [odds ratio (OR): 0.90, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.83-0.97 and OR 0.88, 95% CI: 0.82-0.96, respectively]. The association was restricted to Caribbean and African populations. A significant positive association was observed between GSTM1 deletion and prostate cancer in smokers in African-American studies (OR: 1.28, 95% CI: 1.01-1.56), whereas a reduced risk was observed in never-smokers (OR: 0.66, 95% CI: 0.46-0.95). The risk of prostate cancer increased across quartiles of pack-years among subjects carrying the deletion of GSTM1 but not among subjects carrying a functional GSTM1. Gene-environment interaction between smoking and GSTM1 may be involved in the etiology of prostate cancer in populations of African descent.