Long-term sustained disease control in patients with mantle cell lymphoma with or without active disease after treatment with allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation after nonmyeloablative conditioning.

Publication Type:

Journal Article

Source:

Cancer, Volume 121, Issue 20, p.3709-3716 (2015)

Accession Number:

26207349

Keywords:

Bioinformatics Core Facility, Research Trials Office Core Facility - Biostatistics Service

Abstract:

Background: Previously, early results were reported for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) after nonmyeloablative conditioning with 2 Gy of total body irradiation with or without fludarabine and/or rituximab in 33 patients with mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). Methods: This study examined the outcomes of 70 patients with MCL and included extended follow-up (median, 10 years) for the 33 initial patients. Grafts were obtained from human leukocyte antigen (HLA)–matched, related donors (47%), unrelated donors (41%), and HLA antigen–mismatched donors (11%). Results: The 5-year incidence of nonrelapse mortality was 28%. The relapse rate was 26%. The 5-year rates of overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were 55% and 46%, respectively. The 10-year rates of OS and PFS were 44% and 41%, respectively. Eighty percent of surviving patients were off immunosuppression at the last follow-up. The presence of relapsed or refractory disease at the time of HCT predicted a higher rate of relapse (hazard ratio [HR], 2.94; P = .05). Despite this, OS rates at 5 (51% vs 58%) and 10 years (43% vs 45%) were comparable between those with relapsed/refractory disease and those undergoing transplantation with partial or complete remission. A high-risk cytomegalovirus (CMV) status was the only independent predictor of worse OS (HR, 2.32; P = .02). A high-risk CMV status and a low CD3 dose predicted PFS (HR, 2.22; P = .03). Conclusions: Nonmyeloablative allogeneic HCT provides a long-term survival benefit for patients with relapsed MCL, including those with refractory disease or multiple relapses.