Impact of acute kidney injury on long-term mortality after nonmyeloablative hematopoietic cell transplantation.

Publication Type:

Journal Article

Source:

Biology of blood and marrow transplantation : journal of the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation, Volume 14, Issue 3, p.309-15 (2008)

Keywords:

2008, Adult, Clinical Research Division, Disease-Free Survival, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Hematologic Neoplasms, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, Humans, Incidence, Kidney, Kidney Diseases, Male, Middle Aged, Retrospective Studies, Severity of Illness Index, Survival Rate, Time Factors

Abstract:

Acute kidney injury (AKI) occurs frequently after nonmyeloablative hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). The severity of AKI after nonmyeloablative HCT has association with short-term mortality. However, the long-term effect of AKI on survival after nonmyeloablative HCT is not known. We performed a retrospective analysis of patients who underwent an HLA matched nonmyeloablative HCT between 1997 and 2006. Patients were followed for a median of 36 (range: 3-99) months. AKI occurring up to day 100 was defined as a >2-fold increase in serum creatinine or requirement of dialysis. Of the 358 patients who were included in the analysis, 200 (56%) had AKI, 158 (44%) had no AKI. Overall, 158 patients (43%) died during follow-up. After controlling for potential confounders, the adjusted hazard ratio for overall mortality associated with AKI was 1.57 (95 % confidence interval [CI] 1.2-2.3; P = .0006). The adjusted hazards ratio of nonrelapse mortality (NRM) associated with AKI was 1.72 (95% CI 0.9-3.1; P = .07). AKI is an independent predictor of overall mortality after nonmyeloablative HCT. This finding reiterates the importance of identifying preventative strategies in nonmyeloablative HCT for attenuating incidence and severity of AKI.