Donor and recipient sex in allogeneic stem cell transplantation: what really matters.

Publication Type:

Journal Article

Source:

Haematologica (2016)

Abstract:

We investigated whether and how recipient-donor sex affects transplantation outcomes of 11,797 patients transplanted between 2008 and 2010. Thirty-seven percent were male recipients with male donors, 21% male recipients with female donors, 25% female recipients with male donors, and 17% female recipients with female donors. In multivariable analyses, male recipients had inferior overall survival and progression-free survival compared to females regardless of donor sex, with an 11% relative increase in the hazard of death (p<0.0001) and a 10% relative increase in the hazard of death or relapse (p<0.0001). The detrimental effect of male recipients varied by donor sex. For male recipients with male donors, there was a 12% relative increase in the subdistribution hazard of relapse compared with female recipients with male donors (p=0.0036) and male recipients with female donors (p=0.0037). For male recipients with female donors, there was a 19% relative increase in the subdistribution hazard of non-relapse mortality compared with male recipients with male donors (p<0.0001) and a 22% relative increase compared with female recipients with male donors (p=0.0003). In addition, male recipients with female donors showed a 21% relative increase in the subdistribution hazard of chronic GVHD (p<0.0001) compared with female recipients with male donors. Donor sex had no effect on outcomes for female recipients. Transplantation of grafts from male and female donors was associated with inferior overall survival and progression-free survival in male recipients with differing patterns of failure. Recipient sex is an important prognostic factor independent of donor sex.