Comprehensive analysis of HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-C, HLA-DRB1, and HLA-DQB1 loci and squamous cell cervical cancer risk.

Publication Type:

Journal Article

Source:

Cancer research, Volume 68, Issue 9, p.3532-9 (2008)

Keywords:

2008, Adolescent, Adult, Age Distribution, Aged, Carcinoma, Squamous Cell, Case-Control Studies, Center-Authored Paper, DNA Mutational Analysis, Female, Gene Frequency, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, HLA-A Antigens, HLA-B Antigens, HLA-C Antigens, HLA-DQ Antigens, HLA-DR Antigens, Humans, Membrane Glycoproteins, Middle Aged, Prevalence, Public Health Sciences Division, Risk Factors, Sexual Partners, Shared Resources, Smoking, Specimen Processing Core Facility, Uterine Cervical Neoplasms

Abstract:

Variation in human major histocompatibility genes may influence the risk of squamous cell cervical cancer (SCC) by altering the efficiency of the T-cell-mediated immune response to human papillomavirus (HPV) antigens. We used high-resolution methods to genotype human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I (A, B, and Cw) and class II (DRB1 and DQB1) loci in 544 women with SCC and 542 controls. Recognizing that HLA molecules are codominantly expressed, we focused on co-occurring alleles. Among 137 allele combinations present at >5% in the case or control groups, 36 were significantly associated with SCC risk. All but one of the 30 combinations that increased risk included DQB1*0301, and 23 included subsets of A*0201-B*4402-Cw*0501-DRB1*0401-DQB1*0301. Another combination, B*4402-DRB1*1101-DQB1*0301, conferred a strong risk of SCC (odds ratio, 10.0; 95% confidence interval, 3.0-33.3). Among the six combinations that conferred a decreased risk of SCC, four included Cw*0701 or DQB1*02. Most multilocus results were similar for SCC that contained HPV16; a notable exception was A*0101-B*0801-Cw*0701-DRB1*0301-DQB1*0201 and its subsets, which were associated with HPV16-positive SCC (odds ratio, 0.5; 95% confidence interval, 0.3-0.9). The main multilocus associations were replicated in studies of cervical adenocarcinoma and vulvar cancer. These data confirm that T helper and cytotoxic T-cell responses are both important cofactors with HPV in cervical cancer etiology and indicate that co-occurring HLA alleles across loci seem to be more important than individual alleles. Thus, certain co-occurring alleles may be markers of disease risk that have clinical value as biomarkers for targeted screening or development of new therapies.