The CLOSER trial: a multi-center study on the clinical safety and effectiveness of closer(TM) VSS, a novel resorbable transfemoral vascular access sealing system.

Publication Type:

Journal Article

Source:

Catheterization and cardiovascular interventions : official journal of the Society for Cardiac Angiography & Interventions (2017)

Abstract:

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of the Closer Vascular Sealing System (VSS) against prespecified performance goals (PGs) in sealing femoral arterial access following 5-7 Fr procedures.

BACKGROUND: Inconsistent safety profiles, costs and learning curves of earlier generation vascular closure devices have limited their widespread use following transfemoral procedures.

METHODS: In this prospective single-arm, multi-center trial, we compared the clinical outcomes in patients undergoing 5-7 Fr transfemoral diagnostic or interventional procedures and access sites managed with Closer VSS against pre-specified PGs. The primary endpoints were time to hemostasis (TTH) and 30-day access site closure-related major complications; secondary endpoints included time to ambulation (TTA), time to discharge eligibility (TTDE), time to discharge (TTD), 30-day access site minor complications, procedure and device success.

RESULTS: A total of 220 subjects (49.5% interventional) were enrolled. The mean TTH was 1.78 ± 7.81 min in the intention to treat and 0.98 ± 3.71 min in the per protocol cohort. Median TTH was 0 min with immediate hemostasis achieved in 80.5% of subjects, mean TTA was 2.50 ± 1.05 hr, and mean TTDE was 2.83 ± 1.54 hr. Thirty-day follow-up was completed on 219 subjects. There were no access site closure-related major complications, minor complication rate was 0.0% for diagnostic and 2.75% for interventional procedures.

CONCLUSIONS: In patients undergoing 5-7 Fr transfemoral diagnostic and interventional procedures, the CLOSER Trial met both its primary effectiveness and safety PGs. Immediate hemostasis was achieved in the majority of patients without major complication.