Allogeneic Transplantations, Fas Signaling, and Dysregulation of Hepcidin.

Publication Type:

Journal Article

Source:

Biology of blood and marrow transplantation : journal of the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation, Volume 19, Issue 8, p.1210-9 (2013)

Keywords:

2013, Center-Authored Paper, Clinical Research Division, Experimental Histopathology Core Facility, Flow Cytometry Core Facility, June 2013, Translational Bioimaging Center Core Facility

Abstract:

Hepatic iron overload is common in patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation. We showed previously in a murine model that transplantation of allogeneic T cells induced iron deposition and down-regulation of hepcidin (Hamp) in hepatocytes. We hypothesized that hepatic injury was related to disrupted iron homeostasis triggered by the interaction of Fas-ligand, expressed on activated T cells, with Fas on hepatocytes. In the current study, we determined the effects of modified expression of the Flice inhibitory protein (FLIP long [FLIPL]), which interferes with Fas signaling, on the impact of Fas-initiated signals on the expression of IL-6 and Stat3 and their downstream target, Hamp. To exclude a possible contribution by other pathways, we used agonistic anti-Fas antibodies (rather than allogeneic T cells) to trigger Fas signaling. Inhibition of FLIPL by RNA interference resulted, as expected, in enhanced hepatocyte apoptosis in response to Fas signals but also in decreased levels of IL-6, Stat3, and Hamp. In contrast, overexpression of FLIPL protected hepatocytes against agonistic anti-Fas antibody-mediated apoptosis and increased the levels of IL-6 and Stat3, thereby maintaining the expression of Hamp in an NF-κB-dependent fashion. In vivo overexpression of FLIPL in the liver via hydrodynamic transfection, similarly, interfered with Fas-initiated apoptosis and prevented down-regulation of IL-6, Stat3, and Hamp. These data indicate that Fas-dependent signals alter the regulation of iron homeostasis and suggest that signals initiated by Fas may contribute to peritransplantation iron accumulation.