Grant Descriptions

Descriptions of shared resource facilities, instrumentation and services for use in grant applications are available below. You can copy and paste the content needed into the appropriate section of your grant.






Antibody Technology


Arnold Library

Short Grant Description

The Arnold Library provides high quality, responsive services and resources in support of Fred Hutch's research, education and patient care programs. Our physical space houses study carrels with wireless Internet access, patron computers and the Shared Resources Computer Lab. .  This centralized resource encompasses subscription management for more than 30,000 ebooks and over 37,000 online journals and a variety of databases and web services. Librarians curate Fred Hutch researchers profiles, provide center-wide tracking of scholarly publishing, support Center authors with NIH Public Access Policy compliance, manage the Shared Resources website, provide training and support for citation management tools like EndNote, provide reports and consultation on publication metrics, host a course guides system to support faculty instructors, manage the Fred Hutch history archive and administer several institutional repositories.

Long Grant Description

The Arnold Library supports the Center's research, education and patient care programs.  The library is centrally located in the Weintraub Building, on the Hutchinson Center’s South Lake Union Campus.  At over 5400 square feet, the library includes: a public access computer center, wireless network connectivity, study carrels, a reference collection room, book and journal stacks, a self-service copier room, an information desk, a self-checkout workstation, and work space for library staff.

Library services include course reserves, instructional support, dissertation binding, document delivery/interlibrary loan, library material photocopying, reference and literature searching, remote access (this allows library account holders to log-in and use online library resources from any computer with Internet connectivity).

Librarians curate Fred Hutch researcher profiles, provide center-wide tracking of scholarly publishing, support Center authors with NIH Public Access Policy compliance, manage the Shared Resources website, provide training and support for citation management tools like EndNote, provide reports and consultation on publication metrics, host a course guides system to support faculty instructors, manage the Fred Hutch history archive and administer several institutional repositories.

Library resources include over 25,000 full-text electronic books, more than 32,000 electronic journals, and over 30,000 hardcopy journal and book volumes.  Additional resources are outlined below: 

  • Arnold Library Online Catalog – search the library’s holdings online.
  • Converis  - Faculty Expertise Profiles, Publication tracking and metrics 
  • COS Funding Opportunities
  • Current Index to Statistics - An index to publications in statistics and related fields.
  • Laboratory Protocols online from Springer, Wiley (Current Protocols, Cold Spring Harbor, Nature and more.
  • JSTOR Mathematics and Statistics Collection - JSTOR provides access to the backfiles of 30 mathematics and statistics journal titles.
  • MathSciNet – an index to journal literature in pure and applied research level mathematics from 1940 – present.
  • National Library of Medicine LOCATORplus - The online catalog of journals, books, and media in the world's largest medical library.
  • Ovid – Provides access to MEDLINE
  • ProQuest – Online, full-text general interest journals and both major and local newspapers.
  • Proteome BioKnowledge Library - The Proteome BioKnowledge Library is a collection of six databases focused on the 
  • PubMed from the National Library of Medicine (Get Article enabled) - NLM's version of Medline with direct links to our full-text journal subscriptions.
  • Faculty of 1000 Biology – online research service that comprehensively and systematically highlights and reviews the most interesting papers published in the biological sciences, based on the recommendations of a faculty of well over 2300 selected leading researchers.  Access this directly or via PubMed.
  • Web of Science
    • Science Citation Index – This index covers over 3300 science journals from 1971 to present.
    • Journal citation reports (JCR) - presents quantifiable statistical data that provides a systematic, objective way to evaluate the world's leading journals and their impact and influence in the global research community.
  • Lexis/Nexis Academic - International in scope, LexisNexis academic provides full-text access to more than 6,000 legal, news and business sources.
  • Science Online- Full text of the journal Science from 1880 to present, Science News, Careersand Signaling (the Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment).
  • LibGuides – A course and/or subject guide web service which library staff use to support faculty instructors and other educational activities.


Biologics Production




Collaborative Data Services

Short Grant Description

Collaborative Data Services provides technical support in the areas of survey implementation, quality control, data management, and programming. Services include sample development, interviewing, mailing and tracking of questionnaires, data entry, programming support, database management and tracking study participants lost to follow-up. The resource is housed in the Arnold Public Health Sciences Building, on the Hutchinson Center South Lake Union Campus

Long Grant Description

Collaborative Data Services (CDS) provides technical support in the areas of survey implementation, quality control, data management, and programming. Services include sample development, telephone and in-person bilingual interviewing, mailing and tracking of questionnaires, data entry, custom programming, database management, clinical trials management, and respondent tracking. All staff has received Human Subject Research and HIPAA training. CDS is overseen by a Faculty Oversight Committee, comprised of 7 FHCRC faculty members, who meet with the director and core managers 3 times a year.

CDS is located at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center (FHCRC) South Lake Union Campus on the 1st floor of the Arnold Building. The resource is housed in the Arnold Public Health Sciences Building, on the Hutchinson Center South Lake Union Campus, and is readily accessible to both investigators and research project staff. The resource occupies approximately 6,700 square feet and includes nineteen offices or shared spaces for managers and staff, supporting three cores: Interviewing, Data Control and Programming, and a staff of 21.

The Management/Administrative Team has five management offices and two intern offices. The resource has access to several other shared spaces, including a secure short-term records storage room, a library/conference room, a break-room, a mail and copy room, and two full computer racks in a secure server room.   All spaces are in proximity to one another.

Interviewing Core

The Interviewing core utilizes a state-of-the-art computerized call center for telephone data collection. All interviewing workstations are equipped with a computer workstation for call management and real-time data entry. The call center has nineteen privacy cubicles for interviewing, and a work and storage area. CDS has four lead interviewer offices set-up for monitoring interviewer telephones and computers for quality control.

The CDS programming core has developed and maintains custom software for sophisticated call center management (including random digit dialing). Electronic surveys are implemented using DatStat Illume and REDCap. All interviewing workstations can be remotely monitored by Lead Interviewers.

The resource also offers interviewer training for scientific study personnel. This training is performed upon request and is tailored to the needs of the specific study. CDS has trained interview staff for English and non-English language interviews, in person and telephone-based studies, using either computer or paper-based data gathering.

Data Control Core

The Data Control core has three offices for full-time staff and four workstations for part-time employees, and a meeting area. This core has 6 computers, which run multiple applications including Office, Illume and Express Scribe. It also has a workroom for high-speed scanning, label printing, color printing, and mail assembly space for customized mailings to participants.

The CDS Data Control core has access to the standard office equipment but also owns 2 Brady Label Printers 360X for freezer labels.

The Data Control core offers a variety of services including: data entry with double entry quality assurance, data abstraction; file redaction; document scanning; transcription and mail assembly. In addition Data Control provides the Lost-to-follow-up Tracking Service to studies who have lost contact with study participants and need to re-engage. This service has a success rate of over 90%. Data entry can be performed using DatStat Illume, REDCap, or Microsoft Access. In addition, the experienced CDS Data Control staff is flexible and can also enter data into other systems, if required by our clients.

Programming Core

The Computer Programming core has five computing offices equipped with programming workstations, and a meeting area with a conference table.

The core comprises four programmers with a proven track record in custom software development, and has created databases and applications for hundreds of projects. It also includes a project manager.

Services offered include custom software development; database design and creation; clinical trial management; web site creation; and project management.

The experienced Programming Core uses a diverse mix of databases and custom applications hosted on a robust server infrastructure to provide hosting services for Consortium clients. The department uses VMWare-based virtual servers hosted by Center IT and located in a state of the art data center.

The CDS Programming Core takes security and privacy seriously and all sytems are created with IRB compliance in mind. In addition, software systems can be customized to be compliant with FISMA or 21 CFR Part 11 requirements, if necessary.


Comparative Medicine

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Electron Microscopy

Short Grant Description

The Electron Microscopy Shared resource is a full service laboratory providing transmission and scanning electron microscopy.  The services include cryo techniques and capabilities, negative staining for high resolution viral work, particle counting, labeled antibody studies (immunogold), cell biology and structural studies. Resource instruments include one JEOL JEM-1400 transmission electron microscope and one JEOL JSM-6610LV scanning electron microscope.

Long Grant Description

The Electron Microscopy Shared Resource provides transmission and scanning electron microscopy and a variety of sample preparations.  Electron microscopic examination is captured using Gatan CCD cameras. Services include cryo techniques and capabilities, negative staining for high resolution viral work, particle counting, labeled antibody studies (immunogold), cell biology and structural studies.  The Electron Microscopy Shared Resource occupies approximately 2000 square feet on the E level of the Thomas Building, on the Hutchinson Center South Lake Union Campus. 

Resource equipment includes two electron microscopes supported by specialized ancillary equipment to meet the needs of a wide range of scientific inquiry.  Electron microscopes include one transmission electron microscope and a scanning electron microscope. A JEOL JEM -1400 transmission electron microscope is a 120 KV instrument with a Gatan 2K x 2K pixel Ultrascan 1000XP bottom mount camera for high resolution work and a 11 megapixel SC1000 Orius side mount Gatan CCD camera for large field of view work.  The microscope has capabilities for direct on-screen measurement of cell components, virus particles and DNA strands; low magnification capabilities to more accurately bridge the gap between light and electron microscopy; 90 degree image rotation to achieve optimal orientation of the specimen; computer controlled 5-axis goniometer stage for electron tomography and automated montage acquisition; Windows-based graphical user interface (GUI) and the ability to digitize images.  The JEOL JSM-6610LV scanning electron microscope is a high-performance SEM for fast characterization and imaging of fine structures on both small and large samples.  It is equipped with a a large specimen chamber and automated specimen stage.  The microscope has low vacuum capabilities for observation of non-conductive specimens.

The resource is also supported with Leica cryo equipment.  The equipment includes a high pressure freezing apparatus, freeze substitution system, and low temperature cryochamber for sectioning.  The equipment produces superior cellular preservation for morphological studies and better antigen retention for immunolabeling work.  Ancillary equipment includes a Ted Pella microwave and easiGlow, Tousimis CPD, Beckman airfuge, Denton carbon evaporator and sputter coater, three Leica ultra microtomes, and a Leica Vibratome.

All computers supporting these microscopes are connected to the Hutchinson Center’s networked computer system and provide the opportunity to transfer images to remote locations within the Center.  Data storage and archiving is maintained by the Hutchinson Center’s Information Technology department.  Data is distributed via a networked computer system providing all investigators immediate access to their data.   A data management infrastructure is in place to handle data generated by the facility.  This system is scalable for expansion to meet future data storage needs.


Experimental Histopathology

Short Grant Description

Experimental Histopathology offers histology, special stains, immunohistochemistry, digital pathology, and pathology support. We have extensive experience with human and animal tissue and provide routine support as well as customized protocol development. Immunohistochemistry services include antibody optimization, immunofluorescence (IF) and multi-color IF.

Long Grant Description

The Experimental Histopathology Shared Resource occupies 1200 square feet of laboratory space on the DE Level of the Thomas Building, on the Hutchinson Center’s South Lake Union Campus. The resource provides support for the preparation, analysis, and interpretation of tissue and cell specimens using histological and immunohistochemical methodology.  The resource has a great deal of experience working with human specimens as well as animal models.  The laboratory is well equipment with automated Tissue Tek Paraffin Processors, Tissue Tek Paraffin Embedding units, Sakura H&E stainer, Leica Microtomes, Leica Cryostats, Dako immunohistochemistry stainers, Nikon microscopes and stereoscope, Nikon cameras, Aperio ScanScope AT, and Aperio ScanScope FL. In addition, the resource is staffed with HT and HTL-certified histology technicians with a wide range of clinical and research experience.

Histology services include tissue fixation, embedding, sectioning, and hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining of both paraffin embedded and frozen samples. Cytocentrifugation and histogel embedding is available for preparation of cytology specimens. Special procedures have been developed to section samples for molecular analysis. In addition, the laboratory is skilled at preparing tissue and slides for tissue microarrays (TMA).

The laboratory offers a wide spectrum of Special Stains including periodic acid-Schiff (PAS), Wright Geimsa, Movat’s pentachrome, reticulin, silver stains, iron stain, Massons trichrome, Alcian blue, Nuclear Fast Red, and stains for various bacteria and fungus. Several techniques are available to stain whole tissue and frozen tissue sections for beta-galactosidase expression. Special stain development is also available to support the needs of various studies.

Extensive immunohistochemistry services are available. The laboratory uses automated immunochemistry stainers in order to offer consistency and standardized protocols on large and small scale projects. Over 140 hundred antibody protocols are available for a staining human and animal tissue. These antibodies include markers for cellular identification, proliferation, tumor type and progression, apoptosis, and activation. This is often made possible utilizing the antigen retrieval techniques that we have available for formalin fixed tissue. Various detection methods are offered including horseradish peroxidase, alkaline phosphatase, and fluorescence. This flexibility allows for a wide spectrum of staining including dual immunohistochemistry and multi-color immunofluorescence. The laboratory also offers services in antibody optimization, novel antibody staining protocols, and antibody validation.

Digital Pathology services are also available through the resource. The Aperio ScanScope AT has the capacity to scan 400 bright field slides automatically at 20x or 40x. The Aperio ScanScope FL has the capacity to scan 5 fluorescently stained slides automatically at 20x or 40x. The system includes Spectrum, a robust web-based software to manage and archive digitized histology data. In addition, image analysis software is available for both bright field and fluorescent images through Aperio and Definiens and includes nuclear, cytoplasmic, and membrane analysis, color deconvolution, microvessel quantification, pathology pattern recognition, and TMA analysis tools. Digital slide images can also be shared with collaborators at other institutions using Second Slide.

Pathology review is available for histology and immunohistochemistry analysis.  In addition, the staff collaborates with a number of veterinary/comparative and clinical pathologists. The resource has a 5-headed Nikon microscope with a camera to facilitate the review of samples and capture critical data.


Flow Cytometry

Short Grant Description

The Flow Cytometry lab occupies roughly 1800 square feet on the E level of the Thomas building on the South Lake Union campus. The facility provides researchers access to six cell analyzers and six cell sorters. Detection capabilities on these instruments range to five excitation lasers and eighteen color emission. The facility provides a number of services including: training on equipment use, assistance with experimental design, and consultation on data analysis and interpretation.

Long Grant Description

The Flow Cytometry Shared Resource provides support for cell analysis and sorting. The resource occupies roughly 1800 square feet on the E level of the Thomas Building, at the Hutchinson Center’s South Lake Union campus. Included in the facility are dedicated rooms for cell sorters, common rooms for benchtop analyzers, a wet lab, offices, and storage.

The facility maintains five fluorescence activated cell sorters, seven benchtop cytometers, and two magnetic bead sorters. Three of the cell sorters are Becton Dickinson FACS Aria II cell sorters. One of these is equipped with five lasers and can detect up to 18 colors. A second Aria is equipped with four lasers and can detect up to 13 colors. The last Aria is equipped with three lasers and can detect up to 18 colors. The facility has a Becton Dickinson Influx high speed cell sorter that is equipped with five lasers and can detect up to 15 colors. Two of the Bench top analyzers are Becton Dickinson LSR II cytometers. The first being equipped with five lasers and capable of detecting up to 18 fluorescent markers, while the other is equipped with four lasers and detection of up to 18 markers. Both of the LSR IIs are equipped with High Throughput Samplers (HTS) capable of running 96 samples in as little as 15 minutes. The facility has two three laser 8 color Becton Dickinson Canto IIs also equipped with an HTS unit. The facility also maintains a Becton Dickinson FACS Canto analyzer capable of detecting up to 6 fluorescent markers. Additionally, the laboratory has a Becton Dickinson FACS Calibur cytometer that is equipped for four-color detection. The flow cytometry laboratory also operates two Miltenyi AutoMACS Pro magnetic bead cell sorters one of which is dedicated for sorting cells for long term storage, while the other is for general use.

Data storage and archiving is maintained by the Center’s Information Technology department. Data is distributed via a networked computer system providing all investigators immediate access to their data. A data management infrastructure is in place to handle data generated by the facility. This system is scalable for expansion to meet future data storage needs. The flow cytometry facility supports a variety of desktop software which is available to all users, facilitating interactive analysis on investigator’s laboratory computers.

After-hours access to the lab and instrumentation is dependent upon user completion of training course certification. The lab offers informal one-on-one or small group training to researchers on the proper use of both the cell sorters and benchtop analyzers. Informal and on-line training is available on the use of lab supported flow cytometry software packages.


Genomics

Short Grant Description

The Genomics & Bioinformatics Shared Resource has state-of-the art instrumentation and experienced staff who provide microarray, CE sequencing, NextGen sequencing, and high-throughput screening services. Technologies include: Agilent and Illumina (microarrays); ABI/Life Technologies (CE sequencing and qPCR); Qiagen (PyroMark sequencing); Illumina HiSeq 2500, Illumina MiSeq, and Roche/454 GS Junior (NextGen sequencing); NanoString technologies; various shRNA and siRNA libraries from Open Biosystems, Qiagen, and Invitrogen (RNAi); and drug and compound libraries from MicroSource and ChemDiv (high-throughput screening). The Resource also has sophisticated data management and analysis resources, including 4 dedicated staff members with the expertise to assist in data processing and analysis.

Long Grant Description

The FHCRC Genomics & Bioinformatics Shared Resource provides services and support to the genomics-based research needs of FHCRC/UW Cancer Consortium members. The Resource is comprised of the Genetic Analysis Laboratory, providing DNA sequencing, genotyping, and quantitative (real-time) PCR services; the DNA Array Laboratory, providing expertise in microarray technologies and applications; and the High-Throughput Screening Laboratory, providing shRNA, siRNA, and compound screening services. In addition, the Resource also has a small staff of IT and bioinformatics specialists to support the activities of the various labs. Staffing consists of a PhD-level director, 6 FTE technicians, and 4 FTE bioinformatics support specialists.

Genetic Analysis Laboratory

The Genetic Analysis Laboratory occupies 705 sq. ft. on the E-level of the Thomas Building, FHCRC South Lake Union Campus. The lab offers capillary-based and NextGen sequencing services. The laboratory also provides access to user-operated equipment for real-time quantitative PCR. Lab staff process sequencing reactions using a dedicated Applied Biosystems 3730xl DNA Analyzer. A second 3730xl DNA Analyzer is reserved for SNPlex and fragment analysis applications. Services for capillary sequencing include two sample submission options, researcher-provided DNA template or ready-to-sequence cocktail. Staff provides pre- and post-data generation consultation, performs sample preparation and processing, performs data QC, assists investigators with troubleshooting, and maintains instrumentation.

Services for NextGen sequencing include WG sequencing, RNA-seq, ChIP-seq, exome sequencing, targeted resequencing, and numerous unique methodologies to support researchers’ needs. Staff provides extensive pre- and post-sequencing consultation, sample QC, library construction and QC, sequencing, data QC, assistance to investigators with troubleshooting, and equipment maintenance. NextGen sequencing technologies include two Illumina HiSeq 2500 systems, an Illumina MiSeq, and a Roche/454 GS Junior. Additional equipment includes a PerkinElmer Sciclone NGSx Workstation, a Covaris LE220, two Sage Science Pippin Prep gel systems, two Agilent 2100 Bioanalyzers, an Agilent 2200 TapeStation, a Nanodrop ND-1000 spectrometer, a Caliper DropSense 96 spectrometer, an Invitrogen Qubit 2.0 fluorometer, and an ABI StepOne Real-Time PCR System.

The Genetic Analysis Lab also provides targeted quantitative CpG methylation analysis and mutation detection through services provided using PyroMark sequencing technology. Staff provides consultation and assistance with primer design, performs sequencing, and assists with data QC and interpretation. The lab also has two Qiagen PyroMark targeted pyrosequencers – a PyroMark Q24 and a high-throughput PyroMark Q96 MD.

In addition to sequencing technologies, the lab also houses four user-operated ABI Prism 7900 Sequence Detection Systems, one of which is fitted with an automated robotic loading module for increased screening throughput capabilities. Access occurs through a centralized reservation calendar via a web-based interface.

DNA Array Laboratory

The DNA Array Laboratory occupies 1900 sq. ft. and is located on the E-level of the Thomas Building, FHCRC South Lake Union Campus. The lab has been in operation since 1998 and currently offers researchers access to two different commercial microarray platforms, Illumina BeadChip and Agilent Technologies arrays. In addition, the lab also supports NanoString digital barcoding technology.

Microarray assays supported through the lab include differential gene expression, ChIP-chip, array CGH, miRNA expression, and SNP/CNV analyses. Lab personnel perform all functions pertaining to microarray technology, providing consultation on experimental design and array selection, sample QC and labeling, array processing, assistance with troubleshooting, and evaluation of data quality. Laboratory equipment includes an Illumina BeadStation System, comprised of an iScan Reader and additional supporting automation (chip autoloader and a Tecan liquid-handling robot), and a high-resolution Agilent Technologies DNA Microarray Scanner.

NanoString support encompasses the full suite of catalog and custom assays available through the vendor. Lab personnel perform all aspects of sample preparation and processing, as well as assistance with troubleshooting and assessment of data. Laboratory equipment includes a NanoString nCounter Analysis System and a BioRad C1000 Touch Thermal Cycler.

General laboratory equipment includes twelve Applied Biosystems 9700 PCR thermocyclers, a NanoDrop UV/Vis spectrophotometer, two Agilent 2100 Bioanalyzers, and four Maui Hybridization Stations. The lab also has two Robbins Scientific Hybridization Incubators for use with Agilent Technologies arrays.

High-Throughput Screening Laboratory

The High-Throughput Screening Lab occupies two areas on the C2-level of the Hutchinson Building, FHCRC South Lake Union Campus. RNAi reagents consist of GIPZ lentiviral shRNA collections that include genome-wide human (155,695 clones) and mouse (57,600 clones) obtained from Thermo Scientific (formerly Open Biosystems). Clones are available to researchers through an online, searchable shRNA Storefront as either individual clones or as plasmid pools. The siRNA reagents are comprised of the Qiagen Human Transcription Factor siRNA Library (2254 genes, 4 triggers per gene), Qiagen Human Druggable Genome siRNA Library (6961, 4 triggers per gene), Ambion Silencer Select Human Kinase siRNA library (710 genes, 3 triggers per gene), a custom Qiagen Mouse Transcription Factor siRNA Library (1675, 4 triggers per gene), and Qiagen Mouse Druggable Genome siRNA Library (8353, 4 triggers per gene). Small-compound screening libraries consist of the MicroSource Spectrum Drug Library (2,000 compounds) and the ChemDiv Targeted Diversity Drug Library (50,000 compounds).

Instrumentation used to support microplate-based screens include: a dual arm Beckman Coulter Biomek FX with an interchangeable 96 or 384-channel pipettor with optional magnetic-mount 384-well pin tool (arm 1) and vari-span 8 pipettor (arm 2), plus 160-plate stacker carousel with conveyor belt and barcode reader; BioTek ELx405 plate washer with a 50 plate stacker; BioTek MicroFlo Select dispensing system with a 50 plate stacker; Genomic Solutions HiGro Microwell plate growth system; two Napco 8000DH C02 incubators; Motic AE21 inverted microscope; Molecular Devices SpectraMax Plus absorbance microplate reader; and Perkin Elmer EnVision Multi-label microplate reader with Enhanced Luminescence and Turbo Alpha upgrades, barcode reader, and 50 plate stacker.

Bioinformatics Support

Staff members include a database programmer, 3 bioinformatics specialists, and the Resource director, who provide a wide variety of programming and analytical support to the Genomics Resource labs, as well as its end-users.

Most service requests to the Genomics Resource labs occur through various technology-themed modules of HutchBASE, a web-based LIMS that was developed, tested, and implemented by the Resource’s staff. HutchBASE was initially developed using the BASE v2.6 (BioArray Software Environment, Lund University, Sweden) microarray database framework. Over time, the Resource’s developers have overhauled and expanded this system into what is now a broad, highly customized LIMS suited to meet the administrative, technical, and scientific needs of the Genomics Resource and its end-users. In addition to facilitating service requests, HutchBASE captures sample annotation and QC, provides sample-tracking features, manages workflows, automatically triggers data analysis pipeline protocols, produces data QC reports, affords data management capabilities, and initiates service billing reports. The database also offers the end-user electronic lab notebook capabilities for their genomics projects, through the user-defined addition of project and sample annotation fields.

A main objective for the bioinformatics staff is to support the data analysis needs of the Genomics Resource’s end-users. Support is provided for various technologies including microarrays, Nanostring, and NextGen sequencing, and encompasses the wide variety of assays one might perform on a given platform (e.g., expression profiling, ChIP, CNV analysis, CpG methylation analysis). Bioinformatics staff also provides analysis support for data generated in the high-throughput siRNA and small molecule screening facility. The level of support for a given project can vary greatly and may include providing programming advice and assistance with troubleshooting code, support and guidance using commercial and academic analysis tools, and a full range of data analysis strategies that encompass in-depth data QC, various statistical analyses, and bioinformatics. Interpretation of results can be augmented by gene ontology enrichment and pathway enrichment analyses using any number of approaches (e.g., Gene Set Enrichment Analysis, DAVID, Gorilla/ReviGO, Ingenuity Pathway Analysis).

The Genomics Resource also maintains an IP-restricted website where FHCRC end-users can go to access technology specific analysis tools, as well as request access to commercial software (i.e., Ingenuity Pathway Analysis, Partek Genomics Suite).


Glassware Services

Long Grant Description

Glassware Services is responsible for cleaning and sterilizing reusable laboratory glassware on a timely basis. Procedures are routinely available to all laboratories on the Hutchinson Center’s South Lake Union Campus and include washing, drying, and sterilization of glassware, pipette plugging and autoclaving of laboratory liquids. Designated personnel within the facility are responsible for processing and sterilization of biohazardous waste from all laboratories. The resource maintains its College of American Pathology accreditation.

The facility occupies 2929 square feet in the Weintraub Building and 600 square feet in the Thomas Building (for the processing of biohazardous waste). Glassware Services also oversees and matain the more than 30 autoclaves around the center. The central glassware facility is equipped with washers, dryers and ancillary support equipment.


Immune Monitoring


Nutrition Assessment

Short Grant Description

The Nutrition Assessment Shared Resource (NASR) provides state-of-the-art methods for collection of dietary intake data from participants in observational and intervention studies. The resource supports collection and analysis of many dietary assessment instruments.

Long Grant Description

The Nutrition Assessment Shared Resource (NASR) provides state-of-the-art methods for collection of dietary intake data from participants in observational and intervention studies. The resource supports collection and analysis of many dietary assessment instruments.

The resource is physically located in the Arnold Building on the Hutchinson Center’s South Lake Union Campus. The shared space includes a telephone interviewing room, scanning room, work/mail room, storage room and break room with kitchen. The shared interviewing space is approximately 400 square feet and includes a general administrative area, storage closet, small meeting space and 5 interviewer cubicles, each with a high-speed computer, monitor, keyboard, phone, head-set and desk space. This shared space is sound-proofed and used by NASR for 24-hour dietary recall interviews and data entry of food records. Approximately 500 square feet of office space is provided to house resource personnel. Resource support equipment includes a copy machine, printers, a fax machine, two Scantron Insight 4 optical scanners and other standard office equipment.


NWBioTrust

Short Grant Description

Northwest BioTrust (NWBT) is a collaborative resource connecting well-characterized biospecimens to innovative research projects aimed at improving prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of human disease.  Our researchers are located at the University of Washington (UW), Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center (FHCRC), and Seattle Children’s Hospital and Research Institute (SCH and SCRI), and at other institutions throughout Washington State and beyond.  NWBT provides a common portal for researchers seeking human biospecimens for Institutional Review Board (IRB)-approved or exempted studies.  Biospecimens include high-quality human tissue, blood, and other body fluid samples, which may be annotated with clinical and specimen-level data.  NWBT aims to provide reliable and cost-effective service in a self-sustaining way.  Specimens and data typically are distributed de-identified/coded through NWBT’s IRB-approved Honest Broker function, unless a research team has specific IRB approval to receive identified specimens such as for clinical trials.  NWBT provides the following services:

  • Patient consenting,
  • Prospective collection of specimens using protocol-specific methods,
  • Procurement of remnant portions of routine clinical specimens, and
  • Annotation with patient- and specimen-level data.

Long Grant Description

Northwest BioTrust (NWBT) is a collaborative resource connecting well-characterized biospecimens to innovative research projects aimed at improving prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of human disease.  Our researchers are located at the University of Washington (UW), Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center (FHCRC), and Seattle Children’s Hospital and Research Institute (SCH and SCRI), and at other institutions throughout Washington State and beyond.  NWBT provides a common portal for researchers seeking human biospecimens for Institutional Review Board (IRB)-approved or exempted studies.  Biospecimens include high-quality human tissue, blood, and other body fluid samples, which may be annotated with clinical and specimen-level data.  NWBT aims to provide reliable and cost-effective service in a self-sustaining way.  Specimens and data typically are distributed de-identified/coded through NWBT’s IRB-approved Honest Broker function, unless a research team has specific IRB approval to receive identified specimens such as for clinical trials.  NWBT provides the following services:

  • Patient consenting,
  • Prospective collection of specimens using protocol-specific methods,
  • Procurement of remnant portions of routine clinical specimens, and
  • Annotation with patient- and specimen-level data.

Information Technology Systems Supporting Study Registration, Patient Identification, Consenting, and Biospecimen Procurement and Annotation

Study Registration.  Investigators, supported by NWBT staff, register studies and supporting regulatory documentation (IRB approvals, etc.) in a custom- developed Study Registration software system designed for this purpose.

Patient Identification.  Patient- and visit-level data are extracted from the Amalga Clinical Data Repository (CDR) (Caradigm, Bellevue WA), a clinical data aggregation platform managed by UW Medicine that integrates information from multiple medical systems including various Epic, Cerner, and Sunquest systems that contain clinical phenotype information, and source systems supporting clinic and surgery scheduling.  Using Amalga data, the feasibility of studies may be assessed, and scheduled visits by patients meeting study criteria may be anticipated.

Consenting.    Consent for use of specimens and clinical data, and for potential re-contact for participation in clinical trials, is sought of UW Medicine and SCCA patients.  Consent is obtained with IRB permission and oversight, is completely voluntary, and can be withdrawn at any time.  A patient’s consent status is not revealed to clinical care providers and does not affect clinical care in any way.  No specimens or data will be made available for research from patients who choose to “opt out.”  Orders for consents may be automatically generated when a patient anticipated by the Patient Identification module visits UW Medicine clinics or hospitals. Signed consents are tracked in the Consent Management module.

Biospecimen Procurement (brochure available at http://depts.washington.edu/nwbt/files/qr/nwbiotrust-biospecimen-flyer.pdf).  NWBT tissue procurement activities occur in the UW Pathology frozen section room, in the Pathology archival block room, NWBT lab space.  The Pathology frozen section room is a 250 ft2 room within the UW Medical Center (UWMC) adjacent to operating rooms, equipped with biosafety hood, gross photography stand with digital camera, dissecting platforms, scales, microtomes, computers connected to clinical and research barcoded label printers, equipment to snap-freeze and temporarily store (on dry ice) specimens prior to transport to researchers or biorepositories, a refrigerator, and an Olympus BX45 microscope with a Leitz digital camera.  Paraffin embedded archival block handling occurs in a 95 ft2 computer-equipped office space located 100 ft from the frozen section room.  Blood processing and temporary specimen holding occur in a 150 ft2 facility in UWMC room RR019 equipped with auditable computerized keypad access.  All freezers have temperature monitors and 24/7 on call notification in case of failures.  NWBT operations staffhave a 180 ft2 space located in UWMC room RR844 equipped with auditable computerized keypad access, a private office for the Assistant Director and four additional workstations equipped with new computers.  All computers listed are connected to an automated nightly network-based backup service.  Histology functions are obtained from consulting laboratories including the UWMC and Harborview Medical Center (HMC) hospital pathology laboratories.

Specimens are accompanied by a standard data set including patient- and visit-level data extracted from the Amalga system.  Additional study-, visit-, and sample-level information including collection details (collection date/time, and for tissues anatomical site of origin, weight, size, storage location, clamp time, tissue removal time, etc.) are entered by NWBT staff into a biospecimen management system (Labmatrix, Biofortis, Inc., Columbia, MD).

For more detailed patient- and visit-level clinical annotation information, the UW Institute of Translational Health Sciences staffs a fee-for-service office whereby researchers may extract EMR-derived data (https://www.iths.org/investigators/services/bmi/), which may be linked to specimens (either identified, or de-identified via NWBT sample codes, depending on IRB permissions).  Further, NWBT staff work on a fee-for-service basis to manually extract information from EMRs if needed, utilizing their Honest Broker status. 

Digital pathology annotations (brochure available at http://depts.washington.edu/pathimg/files/brochure.pdf).  In addition to standard pathology biospecimen annotation(coded diagnosis per aliquot, %neoplasia for tumor specimens, etc.), NWBT has substantial expertise in digital pathology.  NWBT provides whole slide scanning and image hosting services l for intra- and inter-observer reproducibility studies and other image sharing protocols.  Quantitative image analysis services are also available for biomarker expression studies.  The NWBT pathology laboratories are located in two areas.  A 601 ft2 image analysis facility is located in room 421 of the Harborview Research and Training Building on the HMC campus and is equipped with 3 desktop computers and one Wacom Cintiq 22HD tablet annotation screen.  A second  180 ft2 digital pathology office is located in UWMC room RR846 and is equipped with 3 desktop computers, one Wacom Cintiq 24HD tablet annotation screen, and a ScanScope CS (Aperio) for scanning whole slides as diagnostic quality images suitable for pathologist- and computer-aided annotations. 

A suite of Aperio software including Genie, Color Deconvolution, Nuclear, and Microvessel packages, is available.  Aperio software is server-side and runs on two high performance, high capacity Dell PowerEdge R510 servers to host the Aperio eSlide Manager server applications, database, image files, and to facilitate rapid server-side image analysis. The primary server is configured with dual Intel Xeon E5620 8 core processors, 48GB RAM, dual 300GB high performance SAS hard drives for the operating system and database applications, and 14.5 TB of direct attached storage for whole slide image storage. The backup server is configured with a single Intel Xeon E5620 8 core processor, 12GB RAM, dual 300GB high performance SAS hard drives, and 14.5 TB of direct attached storage. The servers are hosted in the UW Information Technology enterprise class datacenter and supported by UW Medicine Department of Pathology Computer Support. The servers (including database, analysis data, and image files) are backed up nightly to a network connected UW-IT Data Backup Service (https://depts.washington.edu/uwtscat/databackuparchive) which provides full backups to two separate geodiverse locations.  


Prevention Center

Short Grant Description

The Prevention Center Shared Resource (PCSR) consists of three unique resource facilities that together support studies in behavior/lifestyle modification and nutrition: the Human Nutrition Laboratory (HNL), the Exercise Research Center (ERC) and the Research Clinic (RC). Designed primarily to support prevention and other population-based studies, the PCSR serves a broad range of investigator-initiated studies into the causes, progression, control, treatment and prevention of cancer and other diseases. The PCSR provides the highly trained staff, an attractive physical space for participants, and the equipment needed to conduct intervention measures, perform clinical exams and assessments and support molecular epidemiologic studies.

Long Grant Description

The Prevention Center Shared Resource (PCSR) consists of three unique resource facilities that together support studies in behavior/lifestyle modification and nutrition: the Exercise Research Center (ERC), the Human Nutrition Laboratory (HNL), and the Research Clinic (RC). Designed primarily to support prevention and other population-based studies, the PCSR serves a broad range of investigator-initiated studies into the causes, progression, control, treatment and prevention of cancer and other diseases. The PCSR provides highly trained staff, an attractive physical space for study participants, and the equipment needed to conduct intervention measures, perform clinical exams and assessments and support molecular epidemiologic studies. 

Located at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center (FHCRC), the PCSR occupies a total of 10,552 square feet in the Arnold building. Free underground parking is provided for all study participants. The facility has a full-time receptionist and reception waiting area, with spill-over waiting shared as part of the Prentice atrium, also located in the Arnold Building E-level. It contains a 16-seat capacity classroom available for use by Consortium members. A bank of offices is available for administrative staff, with a cubicle and computer access station available for visiting faculty and client study contact personnel. Each of the three resources within the facility has dedicated office spaces for managers and a shared space for technical staff.

The Exercise Research Center (4,378 sf) houses state-of-the-art equipment for cardiovascular and strength training, and also contains a 400 square foot multi-purpose room designed for group activities related to health and wellness research. The MGC Diagnostics Pulmonary Exercise System was recently upgraded with state-of-the-art breath-by-breath and ECG monitoring technology and multi-user review software, which interfaces with our internal server for data protection and direct-to-client reporting. The recently updated Trackmaster Treadmill and Lode Corival Cycle Ergometer both interface directly with the Pulmonary Exercise System. The new Graded Exercise Testing (GXT) equipment allows for testing of individuals weighing up to 500 pounds. A code cart is present and fully supplied with medical response medications and supplies, and staff is trained regularly with code drills. The training resource includes 7 PRECOR treadmills, 2 Quinton treadmills, 5 PRECOR recumbent bikes, 2 PRECOR upright bikes, 9 PRECOR Elliptical Trainers, 3 Concept II rowing ergometers, 2 Monark upper/lower body ergometers and 6 CYBEX strength-training machines that target all major muscle groups. There are male and female shower facilities with built-in emergency response systems.

Both the training resource and the multi-purpose rooms are set up with the latest audio-visual technology to enhance all activities with video and audio components. Certified exercise physiologists provide testing oversight and create personalized exercise programs for study participants based upon study protocols and their testing results and individual capabilities.

The Human Nutrition Laboratory (2,908 sf) includes extensive food storage, preparation, and service areas. Over a third of the square footage is devoted to storage, allowing the purchase of food in lot size amounts, and includes a walk-in freezer, walk-in refrigerator, and large dry storage room. The food preparation resource includes both cold and hot food preparation and production areas with a gas cook top, convection ovens, steamers, microwave oven, blast chiller, and a hand operated heat-sealing meal packaging system. The HNL uses Mettler-Toledo scientific balances for accurate food measuring with a range from 0.1mg to 32.2kg. The dining and service areas include a tray assembly/service area and dining room. The service area includes a serving station, double door pass-thru refrigerator, freezer, hot-holding cabinet, 4 microwaves for reheating meals, and beverage station. The dining room seats up to 36 people at one time and can be used for classes and other group activities as necessary. A networked computer system, operated through the Division of Public Health Sciences, is used for data entry, diet development, and HNL food preparation documents. Available nutrition computer software includes ProNutra, ProNessy and Chef Tech.

The HNL provides comprehensive support for the conduct of human feeding studies as well as the food component of behavioral and community nutrition intervention studies. Staff nutritionists provide services including study diet, menu and recipe development, food production and delivery, meal service, data collection, study participant management and monitoring according to intervention protocols.   

The Research Clinic (3,266 sf) includes 8 exam rooms, 4 interview rooms, and a DEXA scanner for measurement of bone density, body fat and total body composition, with a 450 pound load capacity. Two exam rooms are outfitted for gynecologic capabilities including an electronic adjustable table for participants with limited mobility. In addition there are two unisex wheel chair-accessible restrooms for study participant use only, a pharmacy for storage and dispensing of intervention drugs, a specified phlebotomy area, a processing lab with hood capability and specimen pass-through from an attached private restroom.


Proteomics


Scientific Imaging

Short Grant Description

The Scientific Imaging Resource serves as a centralized facility for light microscopy, gel and blot imaging, and for the visualization and quantitative analysis of gel, blot and microscopy data. The facility provides nine fluorescence microscopes, including laser scanning, spinning disk, and swept field confocal microscopes, a dedicated intra-vital multi-photon microscope, a Deltavision fluorescence deconvolution microscope, a high content analysis system for automated imaging an analysis of fluorescent samples in multi-well plate format, a digital pathology system for automated scanning of stained tissue sections and tissue microarray slides, a total internal reflection microscope (TIRF) and super-resolution microscope (N-STORM), and a general purpose microscope for transmitted light and fluorescence image capture. Gel and blot imagers include a GE Typhoon Trio and a Li-cor Odyssey near infra red scanner. Several dedicated computer workstations with a variety of high end image analysis software are available for data visualization and quantitative image analysis.

Long Grant Description

The Scientific Imaging Shared Resource provides support with a variety of optical microscopy technologies, gel and blot imaging, visualization of multi-dimensional microscopy data, and quantitative image analysis. The Imaging facility occupies approximately 1800 square feet of laboratory space, and is located at the Hutchinson Center’s South Lake Union Campus on the E level of the Thomas Building.

Services provided:

Light Microscopy.
The resource provides state of the art instrumentation and support for the imaging and analysis of biological samples at the light microscope level, including brightfield (transmitted light) microscopy, fluorescence microscopy, 3D image restoration (deconvolution), confocal microscopy, automated plate imaging and analysis (high content analysis), whole slide scanning and analysis (digital pathology), multi-photon microscopy, total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRF), suoer resolution localization microscopy (N-STORM), and advanced techniques such as fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), photoactivation, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), and cell ablation. Live cell and time-lapse microscopy are available on several of the resource's instruments.

Gel and blot imaging.
The resource provides two dedicated scanners for the imaging and quantitative analysis of fluorescent, chemiluminescent, and radioactive assays in gels, blots and microplates. A professional flat bed scanner is also available for digitization and quantitation of conventional photographic film (autoradiograms).

Karyotyping.
The resource provides karyotyping of human cells. Other species may be considered upon request.

Consultation and training.
The resource provides training for all instruments and image analysis software , and provides advice on experiment design. The resource also teaches the basics of light microscopy, fluorescence, and quantitative image analysis through classes and workshops.

Instrumentation:

Applied Precision, Inc. Deltavision Elite Wide-field Deconvolution Microscope.
The Deltavision system uses a computational approach to remap the out-of-focus components of three-dimensional fluorescent images. By using a computational approach coupled with cooled CCD detection, this system is able to achieve outstanding sensitivity and resolution. In addition, since the system is not laser based, a wide range of excitation and emission wavelengths can be employed (350nm to >700nm. Fluorescence filters are available for the imaging of a wide range of fluorescent molecules including fluorescent proteins. The system is ideal for high resolution imaging of cells, and for time lapse microscopy.

Cellomics Arrayscan VTI High Content reader.
The Cellomics Arrayscan is a dedicated microscope for automated imaging and analysis of fluorescent samples in multi-well plate format. The system is suitable for high throughput, four-color fluorescence image-based screens. The instrument is equipped with three plate racks and a Catalyst Express robotic arm for unattended loading of up to 45 plates. The system also includes Cellomics High Content Informatics software to extract quantitative data from plate images. Data is stored in a database format on a 2 TB server for viewing and analysis.

Li-Cor Odyssey scanner.
The Li-Cor Odyssey is a dual channel scanner for the detection of far red and near infra-red fluorescence in gels, blots, and multi-well plates. This instrument offers high sensitivity, low background, and is a simpler and more quantitative alternative to chemiluminescent detection. It is particularly recommended for protein studies. Dedicated proprietary Odyssey software is available for data analysis.

Nikon E800 fixed-stage fluorescence microscope.
Designed for routine examination of samples in transmitted light and fluorescent mode, the Nikon E800 provides simple operation, high quality optics, and imaging versatility with dual CCD cameras for fluorescence and transmitted light work, allowing acquisition in 12-bit grey scale and 24-bit RGB color modes. The microscope is equipped with phase contrast and DIC optics for the imaging of unstained specimens, and is equipped with filters for the detection of conventional fluorescent dyes, including DAPI, Fluorescein, GFP, Rhodamine, Texas Red, and Cy5. Acquisition of single frames, or time lapse series, is done with Zeiss Axiovision software.

Nikon TiE swept field confocal and widefield fluorescence microscope (Nikon Live).
The Nikon Live is a versatile microscope system for time lapse imaging of living samples. The system includes a Prairie Technologies Swept Field module for fast confocal imaging of samples labeled with CFP, GFP, YFP and RFP, and similar fluorescent reporters. The system also allows conventional (widefield) fluorescence and transmitted light imaging, including phase contrast and DIC. The system is equipped with a fast piezo-electric stage and motorized filter wheels for fast acquisition of multi-channel 3-D image stacks. The system includes an environmental enclosure to provide controlled temperature and CO2 for live cell time lapse experiments. The microscope is equipped with a very sensitive Photometrics QuantEM EMCCD camera for confocal imaging, and a high resolution Photometrics Coolsnap HQ2 for conventional fluorescence and transmitted light imaging.

Nikon Total Internal Reflection (TIRF) and super-resolution (N-STORM) microscope.
Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence microscopy (TIRF) uses evanescent wave technology to restrict fluorescence excitation to a very thin layer of approximately 100-200 nanometers near the coverslip surface, greatly reducing background fluorescence and improving image contrast. Therefore, TIRF is ideally suited for the detection of faint signals at or near the cell surface, and for the detection of molecules in in vitro reconstituted systems. STORM (Stochastic Optical Reconstruction Microscopy) is a super-resolution technique that relies on the precise localization of individual molecules to provide image resolution down to a few tens of nanometers. The Resource's Nikon system combines TIRF and STORM on a single microscope. The system is equipped with the latest EMCCD technology (Andor iXon X3 EMCCD camera), capable of providing single molecule detection sensitivity. The system includes a four-laser module with 405, 488, 561 and 640 nm laser lines for excitation of blue, green, red and far red dyes and fluorescent proteins. The system is capable of TIRF (as well as conventional fluorescence) imaging in four channels (Blue, green, red, far red). The system can also provide super-resolution images down to 20 nm using Nikon's N-STORM localization technology.

Perkin Elmer Ultraview spinning disk confocal microscope system.
The PerkinElmer Ultraview Vox is a high performance spinning disk confocal microscope system for fast imaging of living specimens. The system is equipped with four lasers (405, 488, 561 and 640 nm) for excitation of Blue, Green, Red and Far Red fluorescent dyes and fluorescent proteins, and is fitted with two sensitive Hamamatsu ImagEM EMCCD cameras for simultaneous acquisition of green and red channels. The system includes a Photokinesis module for photoactivation and photobleaching experiments, and a high power laser for cell ablation and wounding (Photonic Instruments Micro-Point). The instrument is reserved exclusively for live cell imaging. A stage top incubator with temperature control and gas mixer is available to provide a controlled environment for live cell experiments. The system has advanced imaging capabilities, such as multi-point acquisition and FRAP, and is operated through Volocity acquisition and visualization software.

Tissuegnostics Tissuefax Digital Pathology system.
The Tissuefax is an automated microscope system for the scanning and digitization of pathology slides, including large tissue sections and tissue micro-arrays (TMAs). The system includes a motorized stage and autofocus for semi-automated processing of up to eight slides per session. The system is equipped with a high resolution color camera for true-color image acquisition of transmitted light samples such as immunohistochemistry slides, and a monochrome camera for four-channel fluorescence image acquisition of Immunofluorescent samples..The system includes TissueQuest and Histoquest software for quantitative image analysis (slide scoring).

Typhoon Variable Mode Imager.
The GE Typhoon Trio is a multi-mode scanner for the imaging and analysis of radioactive, fluorescent and chemiluminescent samples. The Typhoon Trio includes three lasers (488, 532, and 633 nm) and a choice of emission filters for sensitive imaging of green, red, and far red fluorescent dyes. Phosphor screen technology allows sensitive detection of radioactive samples. With five orders of linear dynamic range, much higher than conventional photographic or X-ray film, the Typhoon can capture an image from both strong and weak signals using a single exposure. The instrument is also capable of imaging chemiluminescent samples. A multi-user license for ImageQuant TL (IQTL) is available for fast and quantitative analysis of gels, blots, and plates.

Zeiss LSM 7 NLO intra-vital multi-photon microscope.
The Zeiss LSM 7 NLO is a dedicated upright multi-photon microscope for intra-vital imaging of cells, tissues, and small animals, including live rodents. Two photon excitation is provided by a Coherent Chameleon Ultra II femtosecond pulsed NIR laser, and a Coherent compact optical parametric oscillator (OPO), which in conjunction can provide wavelengths from 680 nm to 1600 nm. The system is equipped with the highest quality Zeiss objectives, including two dedicated high numerical aperture, long working distance LD Plan-Apocromat 20x/1.0 objectives (for imaging with and without coverslip). The system is also equipped with two ultra-sensitive BiG non-descanned detectors for simultaneous imaging of up to four channels, and is controlled with Zeiss ZEN software.

Zeiss LSM 780 NLO.
The Zeiss 780 NLO is a state of the art laser scanning confocal and multi-photon microscope. The instrument is equipped with five lasers, providing seven excitation lines (405, 458, 488, 514, 560, 594, 633 nm) for the excitation of a broad range of fluorophores and fluorescent proteins. The system is also equipped with a tunable ultrafast Coherent Chameleon Vision II laser for multi-photon excitation. The LSM 780 detection system includes a latest generation GaAsP spectral PMT for extremely sensitive detection of user-defined emission bands, and a two-channel GaAsP non descanned detector (BiG) for ultra-sensitive multi-photon imaging. The system allows sensitive, high resolution imaging of virtually any fluorescent dye in the near-UV to far red range. The system includes high quality Carl Zeiss optics, and allows advanced applications such as large area acquisition (tiling), multi-point visiting, and FRAP/Photoactivation.

In addition to the primary instruments, the resource operates four imaging computer workstations for the visualization, modeling, and quantitative analysis of large datasets such as high resolution 3-D confocal stacks or time-lapse sequences. These workstations run advanced imaging software, including Volocity, Imaris, Zeiss LSM and ZEN confocal software, Metamorph, ImageQuant TL, Cellomics Bioapplications, as well as public domain software Image J.

Data storage and archiving is provided by the Center’s Information Technology department. Data is distributed via a networked computer system providing all investigators immediate access to their data. A data management infrastructure is in place to handle data generated by the facility. This system is scalable for expansion to meet future data storage needs.



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Shared Resources are core facilities that provide services and access to specialized equipment for research activities.


Rajesh K. Uthamanthil, DVM, PhD, DACLAM

Associate Vice President, Shared Resources
Director, Comparative Medicine